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CASE   STUDIES – SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE  CROPS APPLICATION

Case Study  Blight of Sesame (Alternaria sesami)

Trial Field – (FUNAAB) August 2016
Crop Sesamum indicum (sesame)
Biopesticide –ARATI Biopecticides
Lead Investigator: Prof. Victor Olowe
Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (FUNAAB)
Department of Plant Physiology and Crop Protection
Mobile: +234 803 3928 111 Email: olowevio@funaab.edu.ng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sesamum indicum L

Sesame grown with ARATI Biopesticide, FUNNAB, Abeokuta, Oct., 2016 and pictures by Prof. Victor Olowe.

 

Blight of Sesame (Alternaria sesami)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blight of Sesame crop .The causal organism. Alternaria sesame. Symptoms – The pathogen attacks all parts of the plant at all stages – Small, dark brown water soaked,

List of symptoms/signs

Fruit  –  lesions: black or brown

Fruit  –  lesions: on pods

Leaves  –  abnormal leaf fall

Leaves  –  necrotic areas

Stems  –  discoloration of bark

 

Symptoms

Brown to black, round to irregular and often zonate lesions measuring up to 1 cm diam. are produced on the leaves and in severe attacks the leaves dry out and fall off . Stem lesions are either in the form of dark brown spots or streaks. Dark brown, circular lesions are produced on the capsules   which can cause the capsule to drop. The most visible symptoms are the leaf spots which are dark, irregular patches mostly on the edges and tips of the leaves, but the stem rots can be more significant note that can cause seed rot, pre- and post-emergence losses as well as stem rot and leaf spots.
Impact

Although considered an important fungal disease of sesame, there is little information about actual economic impact of A. sesami. Kumar and Mishra (1992) state that most of the common diseases of sesame cause yield losses of 20-40%. This yield loss is caused by the premature defoliation of the plants leading to smaller capsules and loss of capsules due to infection.

 

Cucumber Crop Cultivation 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmer :   Yemi Banjo, Cygnus Farms Limited, Ogun state, Nigeria
Mobile :  +234802221 6857

 

SWEET POTATOES CROP

Collaborator: Dr. A.A  Ano, +234 803 545 8051
Michael Opara , Federal University of Agriculture
National Root Crop Research Institute (NRCRI)
Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria
Researcher: Ayodele Otaiku +234 803 3721219 www.aratibiotech.com
Farm Seasons : 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ayodele A. Otaiku and Dr. A.O Ano (Director, NRCRI) on the 15th Sept, 2011 site training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet Potato planted with 2.5 tons/hectare  of OBD-Biofertilizer harvested  10th Nov., 2011

 

CASSAVA

Collaborator: Dr. A.A  Ano, +234 803 545 8051
Michael Opara , Federal University of Agriculture
National Root Crop Research Institute (NRCRI)
Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria
Researcher: Ayodele Otaiku +234 803 3721219       www.aratibiotech.com
Farm Seasons : 2012-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25 tons/hectare yield

 

RICE CROP

National Cereals Research Institutes  (NCRI), Badeggi, Niger state, Nigeria

Coordinator: Dr. Bakare

Mobile: +234 806 5717 650

Rice (FARO 54 & 52 ) 4.0 t/ha & 5.0 t/ha

Researcher: Ayodele Otaiku  +234 803 3721 219       www.aratibiotech.com
Farm Seasons: 2011-2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ayodele A.Otaiku at NCRI, Badeggi,  Rice Farm

Ayodele  A. Otaiku FARO 44 Rice  Harvest at Natioanl Cereal Resaervh Institute, Badaggi,
Niger state, Nigeria with 5 tons/hectare yield

 

SOY BEAN

Coordinator: Dr. A. A. Soretire
Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria
Mobile: +234 803 3579370
Soya Bean Yield =  3 t/ha
Researcher: Ayodele Otaiku +234 803 3721219     www.aratibiotech.com
Farm Seasons: 2010-2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Soy bean cultivated with inorganic chemical
  2. Soy bean cultivated with organic chemeical (Gateway biofertilizer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Field application and evaluation of the Soy bean crop with 3 ton/hectare

   

SHEA  BUTTER TREES

Shea trees are located over a wide expanse stretching more than 5,000 kilometres across over  23  countries  in sub-Saharan Africa with  shea butter_tree,  insect (Cirina_butyrospermi) larva (caterpillar) that affects tree crop yield (Chimsah Francis A, 2016).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Naughton, C.C, Lovett, P.N., & Mihelcic, J.R. (2015)

Figure  1. Shea zone in Sahel Sub Sahara Africa (23 countries)

Shea Tree Pest Management for Sustainability  Shea Biopesticide produced by Ayodele A.Otaiku (Aratishea Limited, www.aratishea.com) (attached PDF life)

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Francis A. Chimsah, Shea 2016 GSA, Ghana Conferernce

Insect and Parasitic Larvae; Cirina butyrospermi attached the Shea trees in all the Shea belt of the Africa Sahel.

They control pests in a number of ways: by producing toxins outcompeting the damaging pathogen, producing anti-fungal compounds and by promoting root and top growth. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which targets larvae and Pseudomonas syringae, which controls bacterial spot are examples of microbial.

 

Shea Protection & Conservation (attached PDF life)

Even under conservative estimates, the model produced an extensive shea tree suitability area of 3.4 million square kilometres with 1.8 billion trees in 23 countries and over 18 million women collectors, encompassing a total population of 112 million. Methodology applied Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). (Naughton ,2016).

Methodology-   Shea cake wastes fermented with plant extracts inoculated with broad base spectrum microbes for thirty (30) days at room temperature and stirred continuously within ten (10) intervals. The resultant products  is organic acid.  Organic Acids  called Peracids.  and  Pheromones ( to control insect damage through mating disruption).Peracids are highly effective sanitizing agents used for controlling algae and pathogens. Peracids can be used  as a bacterial or fungicidal application to plant foliage or roots. A further advantage is that when peracids degrade, the by product is oxygen, which is safe and beneficial.

Case study: Sesamum indicum (sesame) Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (FUNAAB), Nigeria  for the treatment of  Blight of sesame crop .The causal organism. Alternaria sesame. Although considered an important fungal disease of sesame, cause yield losses of 20-40%. This yield loss is caused by the premature defoliation of the plants leading to smaller capsules and loss of capsules due to infection.

Finding: Biochemical – The pesticides are occurring substances that control pesticide by non-toxic mechanisms.  Biochemical pesticides include such insect sex pheromones that interfere with mating   as well as various scented plant extract that attract  insect pests to traps.  Biochemical   products also include hormones growth regulators and enzymes. Moth Cirina Forda  larvae pathology trait can be managed by Peracids.  and  Pheromones  mechanism of bio-protection without pesticide foot print on the shea trea. Sesamum indicum (sesame) as case study show great impact on improve the crop productivity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ayodele A.Otaiku (white shirt) at Ghana Global Shea Alliance (GSA) 2010 Conference

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.aratishea.com
ayodele.otaiku@aratishea.com    | aotaiku@gmail.com